Repeaters are everywhere.

It's amazing how many repeaters there are in the Metro area. It would be impossible, given the number of amateurs in the area, to have then all active.There are a few that are: 145.450, 444.100, 146.760, 444.650 come to mind, as these repeaters are either echolink nodes or are part of the Handiham network. That's about it. You may wonder if having all these repeaters that no one uses is a waste of spectrum. That may be one way of looking at it.

Now, consider this: if part of the Metro is hit with some sort of event (weather, lost puppy, nuclear attack) there will be enough sites still operational because of geographic dispersal and the independent nature of amateur radio operations. If part of the metro loses commercial power, sites in areas not affected will have commercial power, and those sites with an emergency power source in the affected area will continue to operate. The diversity of spectrum and cross banding will ensure that at least some communication will be possible. If there is no commercial power, there will be repeaters with emergency power to maintain operations, to wit:

(Location, Output frequency, Input tone)
Ramsey 53.550 114.8
Minneapolis 145.370 107.2
Ramsey 145.370 118.8
Richfield 145.390 103.5
Edina 145.430 127.3
Minnetonka 145.450
Blain 146.670 114.8
Minneapolis 146.700 127.3
Plymouth 146.700 127.3
St. Louis Park 146.760
Golden Valley 146.820 127.3
Inver Grove 146.985
Bloomington 147.090
Maplewood 147.120
Minneapolis 147.150 100.0
Carver 147.165 107.2
Burnsville 147.210 100.0
Hampton 147.360 136.5
Mounds View 224.940 100.0
Anoka 442.525 DSTAR
West St. Paul 442.550 100.0
St. Paul 443.100 114.8
Lino Lakes 443.200 151.4
New Brighton 443.425 114.8
White Bear Lake 444.000 DSTAR
Golden Valley 444.175 127.3
Edina 444.200 127.3
Burnsville 444.300 114.8
Richfield 444.475 118.8
Plymouth 444.500 127.3
Columbia Hts. 444.550 114.8
Cologne 444.600
Robbinsdale 444.775 114.8
Maplewood 444.825 114.8
Columbus 444.975 94.8
Ramsey 444.975 114.8

Source: Minnesota Repeater Council